Page Performance: Find out if you are doing better or worse than your competitors!

Our latest addition is called Page Performance and it measures the performance of your Facebook pages. Until now, we have all had access to our Facebook Insights or Facebook statistics, which show us how many new fans we have gained in any given period, the source of those fans and their country of origin, what our reach has been, which of our posts have had more and less interaction, etc. The truth is that we believe that Facebook statistics are very complete and easy to understand, but how do we know how good our data really is? Does it mean that we are doing well or poorly just because they are better or worse than last year? These are the questions that led us to create this new functionality in order to get answers.

What data does Page Performance provide?

Post statistics

Page Performance collects data resulting from the last 50 posts on your fan page and calculates what we consider to be the most important statistics. With this data, we can see whether your Facebook page is doing well or needs improvement. These statistics are shown both as an absolute figure and as a percentage. Below these appears the average for similar pages (i.e. pages with the same number of fans), so we can see whether your statistics are good or below average.

The statistics calculated by Page Performance about your latest posts

The statistics calculated by Page Performance about your latest posts include:

  1. Fans reached by post: It is the average number of fans that Facebook has shown your last 50 non-paid posts to. The percentage shown is with respect to your page’s total number of fans.
  2. Users reached organically: The average number of users that Facebook has shown your last 50 non-paid posts to. These users may or may not be fans of the page, since they could have been shown a post on their timeline because one of their friends has liked it or commented on it. The percentage shown is again with respect to your page’s total number of fans, so it will always be higher than the figure for fans reached by post.
  3. Engagement: The average number of users that have interacted with your posts. We define a user that has interacted with a post as a user that has commented on, shared, or clicked on ‘Like’ or elsewhere on the post (link, photo, video, etc.). The average for this is calculated with respect to the total number of users who have seen the post, i.e. the number of users reached organically.
  4. People talking about your page: Average number of users that have performed an action that may cause others to view the post. In other words, users that have clicked on ‘Like’, commented on the post or shared it. The difference between this and engagement is that the previous statistic also takes into account the people that clicked somewhere on the post even though they may have done nothing further afterwards. This average is also calculated with respect to the total number of fans that have seen the post and logically the percentage is always less than that of the post’s engagement.
  5. Negative feedback: This is the average number of users that have performed a negative action on the post. That is to say that they have marked it as spam or hidden it.  The percentage is calculated with respect to the number of users reached organically.
  6. Viral reach: The average number of users that Facebook has shown each of the posts to following one of the user’s friends having clicked on ‘Like’, commented on the post or shared it. The percentage is calculated with respect to the number of fans. That means that if you could reach the same number of users through the actions of other users as the number of fans that you have, you would end up with a viral reach of 100%. We believe that this is the best comparison to see whether a post is reaching a lot of people or not.
  7. CTR: The number of times users clicked on a post. This could mean that they have shared a link, listened to some audio, watched a video, viewed a photo, etc. The percentage shown for the CTR is calculated with respect to the number of unique views for each post (compared to the number of users reached organically).

Plus, if you have published paid posts, we will also show you the following:

  • Fans reached by paid advertisement or post: It is the average number of fans that Facebook has shown your last 50 paid posts to. The percentage is shown with respect to your page’s total number of fans.
  • Users reached by paid advertisement or post: The average number of users that Facebook has shown your last 50 paid posts to. These users may or may not be fans of the page, since they could have been shown a paid post on their timeline because one of their friends liked it or commented on it. The percentage shown is again with respect to your page’s total number of fans, so it will always be higher than the previous figure.

General fan page statistics

In addition to the above statistics, Page Performance shows you several charts related to all of the data about your Facebook page:

A history of your Likes so that you can see whether there are days when there was faster growth and look at why that happened. In this chart, we show you the beginning and end of your promotions so that you can see whether they have resulted in a significant increase in your number of fans or not.

History of Likes

Fans gained vs Fans lost: Aren’t you curious to find out whether there have been any days on which you’ve lost more fans than you’ve gained? Would you like to know when you’ve gained or lost a lot of fans? You can check on this chart which days stand out and see what type of content is well received or not. From this, you can work out whether your advertisements have had the impact that you wanted and at the moment that you wanted it.

History of Fans

Organic reach: The percentage of users reached organically each month in relation to the number of fans of the page. With this chart, you can see whether you have reached a decent number people or not compared to your number of followers. Also, in this chart you’ll see a series of dots that show the organic reach of your posts, that is, the number of organic impressions of each post. That way you can relate the peaks where the percentage of fans reached is higher with the post or posts that have caused that reach.

Organic Reach

To see in detail what posts have reached more fans organically, just zoom, selecting with the mouse the area you want to watch closely. And so you’ll know which posts have gotten the peaks of higher organical reach.

To see in detail what posts have reached more fans organically, just zoom

Example: In this chart you can see that, where we have zoomed in, there are two peaks of organical reach and each peak is due to the post pointed out by each arrow, because if they have had more organic impressions means they have reached more users. Usually the posts which cause organic reach growth are published the same day or the day before that growth.

Viral reach: This chart shows what percentage of users have been reached thanks to the viral actions of other users. That is to say, because of users that have shared, commented on or clicked on ‘Like’ on your posts. This percentage, as with the previous one, is calculated with respect to your page’s number of fans. Also, in this chart you’ll see a series of dots that show the viral reach of your posts, that is, the number of viral impressions of each post. That way you can relate the peaks where the percentage of users reached is higher with the post or posts that have caused that reach.

Viral Reach

To see in detail what posts have reached more virality, just zoom, selecting with the mouse the area you want to watch closely. And so you’ll know which posts have gotten the peaks of higher viral.

Viral Reach: Zoom

Example: In this chart you can see that, where you have zoomed in, there are two peaks of viral reach and each peak is due to the post pointed out by each arrow, because if they have had more viral impressions means they have reached more users. Usually the posts which cause viral reach growth are published the same day or the day before that growth.

Total Reach: Organic reach vs Paid reach. In this case, the percentage of users reached organically versus the percentage reached through paid advertisements, sponsored posts, etc. is shown. These percentages are also calculated with respect to your Facebook page’s number of fans.

Total Reach

Engaged users: This is the percentage of users that clicked on a link, photo, video, etc. from our page, or that have shared, commented on or clicked on ‘Like’ on one of our posts, compared to the overall number of users reached by the page.

Engaged Users

How can Page Performance be accessed?

You can access it directly on the page dedicated to this service: Page Performance- Find out how well your page is performing

If you have already used the Cool Tabs platform to create promotions or tabs for content, you’ll also be able to access it as follows:

  • You need to be logged in to Cool Tabs. From “Your content”, you can access  Page Performance by clicking on any of the Facebookpages that you have created a promotion or competition on. Plus, you can also access the Statistics and CRM sections of the page.

Page Performance Access

    • The first thing that we’ll ask you to do once you’ve clicked on Page Performanceis to choose the Facebook page for which you want to measure the performance. It must have at least 30 fans.

Choose the Facebook page for which you want to measure the performance

  • Page Performance will start to analyse your posts and then, within seconds, the data and charts mentioned earlier and how you compare with your competitors will be shown. For this comparison, we always choose fan pages with a similar number of fans, but you can choose to compare it with pages with more or less fans than yours, if you wish.

If you’re new to Cool Tabs and you are yet to create any content with us, here’s more information about this new functionality. You just need to sign up for Cool Tabs and you will be able to access the statistics and comparisons that Page Performance offers for free.

Measure your performance now with Page Performance >>